Potassium Iodide Only Necessary During a Nuclear Crisis

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A few days ago I wrote a blog article about various ways to protect and detox from radiation and nuclear fallout. Although potassium iodide (KI) does not detox the body from radiation, it can protect the thyroid from being damaged by radioactive iodine (iodine-131). Iodine-131 is rapidly absorbed by the thyroid gland and, especially in children, increases the risk of thyroid cancer.

News sources including National Geographic report that radioactive iodine was one radioactive chemical released into the atmosphere in Fukushima. Radioactive iodine (iodine-131) vaporizes easily and can disperse over long distances. There is a possibility, though I’m not sure how probable it is, that the West Coast of North America could be negatively affected by the radioactive plume coming from Japan.

There is a very small possibility that people on the North American West Coast will need to take potassium iodide tablets when the plume does reach us. Numerous news sources are telling us not to stock up on potassium iodide because the nuclear accident at Fukushima does not pose a health threat to us. Indeed, today the radioactive plume was reported to have reached Northern California, but officials say that the amount of radiation is so tiny that it poses no health risk.

Potassium Iodide Should Only be Taken during an Emergency Nuclear Crisis

You will be given ample warning and will notified by the press and/or the government whether it is necessary or not to take potassium iodide. In those situations, the government will distribute potassium iodide to its citizens. However, it is best to keep a couple bottles on your shelves in case there is a real emergency where you would need to act quickly. (This is not the case with the Japan situation because we are actively monitoring the radiation levels in Western North America).

Potassium iodide is a synthetic drug. It should not be taken unless there is an actual threat of exposure to radioactive iodine.

Keep Potassium Iodide on your Shelves in Case of Emergency

KI pills are now sold out in the US. Instead of panicking and buying them during a crisis, stock up on some in advance and store them on your shelves. It is a good idea for everyone to keep a bottle or two of potassium iodide on their shelves at all times in the case of a nuclear emergency. It should be added to your emergency first aid kit.

Potassium Iodide Poisoning

Yesterday there were reports from US poison control centres of potassium iodide poisoning. Fearful of radiation poisoning, people were taking potassium iodide pills without any real threat of harm from radiation.

Panic could spark a “mini-epidemic” of potassium iodide ingestion and overdoses, predicted Dr. Leonard Wartofsky, spokesman for the Endocrine Society and a thyroid expert.

There are also very serious consequences from taking potassium iodide for more than 10 days. After that period of time, the drug can induce severe hypothyroidism, a condition that essentially shuts down thyroid function.

Potassium Iodide Alternatives

There really are no other alternatives to potassium iodide. However, KI should only be taken during a real emergency. Kelp, spirulina and chlorella have been proven to detox and protect the body from other forms of radiation. These green food supplements should certainly be taken along with potassium iodide after dangerous exposure to radiation. Kelp, spirulina and chlorella are completely non-toxic and can be taken as part of a daily regimen to protect and detox from all types of radiation. Homeopathic remedies should also be taken for optimal health and detox, as prescribed by a classical homeopath.

By Sonya McLeod
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